"
Newspaper Archive of
The Perkins Journal
Perkins, Oklahoma
Lyft
June 9, 1977     The Perkins Journal
PAGE 2     (2 of 8 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 2     (2 of 8 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
June 9, 1977
 

Newspaper Archive of The Perkins Journal produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2023. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




2-The Perkins Journal Thursday, June 9, 1977 PERKINS JOURNAL Robert L. md Yvomme Evans, Ovmem.Pubiidm Published each Thursday at 133 S. Main Street, Post Office Box F, Perkins, Oldahoma 74059 Second Class Postage Paid at Perki.s. Okla. 74059 Telephone...405-547.2411 Subscription Prices: Payne, Lincoln, Logan and Noble counties ............................. . ......................... $6.00 plus tax Elsewhere ......................................................... $9.00 plus tax MIMIll % A I If now is who I reod in fhe pcecI--Wifl Rogers I II II Illlll I I I I IN I -- Around the Farm by Allan Wall I llll II I Farmers have been cutting their alfalfa hay. This is the second cutting this year. Alfalfa is actually an amaz- ing farm crop. A stand of alf- alfa can last from five to seven years from the time it was planted• On a real good year, you can get five or six cuttings of it. Alfalfa also puts nitrogen in the soil. it has deep roots, and can obtain more water than many other plants. However, if alfalfa is grown in a field for too long a period of time, it robs the soil of too many minerals. This is where crop rotation comes in. The scientific name of al- falfa is Medicago Sativa. In England it is called lucerne. Alfalfa is probably native to Iran. It was introduced into Greece from Media (in north. ern Iran) about 470 B.C. it was carried from Greece to Italy, from Italy to Spain, from Spain to Mexico, from Mexico to Chile, and from Chile to California in about the mid 1800's. Al- though it had already been introduced into New York about 1820, alfalfa spread more rapidly in the west from the introduction into California. It is more adapted to the western U.S. than the East. I I I Illl Harvest is underwayt Grain farmers have been tak- ing to the fields, and com- bines are rolling. Follow this column for further reports. *** We have over 50 White Rock chickens that are now almost 2 months old. All their lives they've been con- fined in one kind of cage or another. Last Friday evening their world was greatly ex- panded. We opened the door of their house, but none of them went outside. So we threw'era out. However, they didn't go very far, ex- cept for the ones I transported a little farther out. For one thing, it was nearing their bedtime, so the far majority of the chic- kens were huddled by their house. I had to throw them back inside. The next day, however, the chickens were thrown outside and stayed for the majority of daylight. They really started to catch on to the idea of pasture. Male chickens are called cockerels till a year old, then they're called cocks. Fe- males are called pullets till a year old, then they're called hens.* See you next week, Senior Citizens News We've been having some strange weather, even for Oklahoma. After all the clouds, rain, and storms, it suddenly turned imo real summer, encouraging the use of air conditioning and helping dry the wheat fields so the combines could get into some of the fields. Then on Monday it turned cool again. Now if it could just manage to rain on the gardens that need it and not rain on the unharvested grain then everyone would be happy, but it just doesn't work that way. Several, have reported canning green beans and beets recently, also cherries and apricots and corn. Monday night, was another good music night with 142 signing the book. Recent visitors at the Cen- ter included Clinton and Wilma Easter's daughter and granddaughter, Katrina and Sharon Pratz of Mesa, Ariz., Mike Reddout, Okla. City, grandson of Floyd and Mabel Caldwell, Raul Sanchez of Oklahoma City, grandson of the Pat Knapps, Brown and Lenora Vesey of Bartlesville, daugh- ter of the John Beelers, Judy Tabor, Faiffax, daughter of Jim Rylant, also G. F. (Dec) and Winnie Robinson, ella- homa City, relatives of Pearl Freeman who came by to see the center and buy some ceramics. I don't know how the ladies find time to do so many ceramics along with the garden and yard work and canning and freezing, but they seem to manage. Guess they do ceramics while they rest. Several large pitchers and bowls and large Indian flower pots are being . made. The quilting ladies are busy again since Mrs. Re. binson's No. 1 was finished last week and No. 2 was put in the frames Monday. It's a Star Pattern and very pret.- ty. Remember the Gospel Music Sunday, June 12, 2 to 4. Several have shown an interest in having this type of program once a month so come and help by singing or playing or just listening. Birthday Dinner this month will be at noon Friday, June 17 and then the same day at 1:30 will be the tests for Diabetes by the County Health Nurse. A letter from Gertrude Dilliner says she arrived home safely and everything at her home was OK,'and "greetings" to everyone at the Center. --Clarrcy .'oak I C e , 6 Miles S. imarron o,s,,..,. Country Ballroom Dance Every Sat. Night 9-1 with Cimarron Cowboys Guests-June 14-Billy Parker Friday, July 8 - Stage Show Only Jim Ed Brown Show with Helen Cornelius Adults-S6.00 Children(under 12) $3.50 Reservatiou or Tickets Rt. 4, Box 60 405.67,4-1201 Stiliwater !,! ...... , n, i i I I III Doc Comments -- Visiting a dream of 50 years ago As you read this, I hope to be crossing the laplands of Oklahoma and Arkansas into the dreams of things of 50 years ago in northwest Alabama. The farm, the ale swimming hole, the green forest and clear running streams where the colorful fish floundered and played in the early morning sun while the birds and wildlife flour- ished with sweet music of songs and mating calls of a variety of pleasant metrical sounds of nature. Visits to loved ones and friends, dec- oration day at the rural church where we attended Sunday School and services. A family reunion for O.V.B.- 's family, the Browns, an an- nual affair of people from over the nation, good food, music and alot of fellowship. Tales of yesteryear that brings both sadness and joy. But before I go, I must fulfill a promise to report the re- sults of medicare handling an ambulance service under review which had been disal- lowed because the patient was not delivered to the dos- est approved facility. It upheld the previous ruling of disallowment which was expected. The fact is that the patient was already in the closest approved facili- ty and the attending physi- clan made a diagnosis at the case and recommended that the service of a specia- list was needed and since the closest approved facility could not furnish such serv- ice, the patient was trans- ferred by ambulance to a fa- cility with the services rec- ommended. In all fairness, we believe the handling by Medicare's servicing agent was made according to their instruction. They said, "The Medicare program pays for transportation from one hospital to another only when the first hospital does not have appropriate facili- ties to care for the patient's condition, the unavailability of a specialist is not consid- eration in determining whether the hospital has ap- propriate facilities." Now since the doctors determined that a specialist was neces- sary prior to an operation, it seems to me that is a very important part of treatment. The doctor's diagnosis was proved to be correct. Medi- care Agent said further con- sideration may be made if the charge exceeded $100. The ambulance charge was $80.00 and that takes care of the request. Now, the problem is that we should have some legis- lation providing medicare with instruction to give the patient the best in treatment according to the doctor's opinin. No one wants an in- cision without a complete diagnosis of the trouble. I am appreciative for the doc- tor's handling of the case. There was more time spent on the preparation and test than was used in the actual operation. The proof of his wisdom and experience is in the success of the opera- tion. It was successful. But we wonder what would have happened if an explorative operation had been perform- ed. I was the patient. Right or wrong, I will always be- lieve the doctor did the right thing and think there should be some consideration given to instruction by Medicare to their agents. I am not unhap- py about it but have sent complete records of the case to members of the U. S. Con- gress and Senate. With Carter's new program on Health, Education and Wel- fare, there's little chance for immediate action for change, but maybe it will get into the new program. It would seem that such instruction violates the patient's freedom of • choice in treatment. Arrivederci T. C. "Dec" Banner Barbs and Wires- A wedding at our house By Ken Anderson Someone called me the other day and asked what it took to be a writer, the first thing that came to mind was the following rules: 1. Shun, avoid, and refrain from recklessly employing unnecessary, excess, and superfluous extra words. 2. Make certain all sen. tences full & complete. If possible. 3. At all costs, in any case, avoid cliches like the plague. 4. Take pains to spell and, punctuate correct. 5. Be consistent. 6. Don't approximate. Always be more or less pre- cise. 7. Sedulously eschew ob- fuscatory hyperverbosity or prolixity. 8. Avoid pointless repetition and don't repeat yourself unnecessarily after you've already said something once and then say it again after having said it the first time. 9. Observe, in all written expression, it is, of the foremost qualification-- if not, certainly not or not less than--at least secondary then, the importance, of whenever possibly trying, so that when, except where it cannot be avoided, and/or in further necessary develop- ment it becomes impera- tive to admit, or omit, yet, remember without fail (for this must not be under: estintated) to be BRIEF and CLEAR. THIS IS VITAL! 10. Always try to remember the extrere iniportance of being accurate, neat, and • careful.. (Thanks to extension specialist Owen McGruder for the abo,,;e.) • An&her .friend, this one the editor of the Coyote "News up in Warm Springs, Oregon, advises that in older to curb drunken driv- ing in other p[rts of the world s6me pretty tough laws have been enacted .... In Malaya, the drunk is jailed. If he is married, his wife goes too. In South Africa, the driver is given a 10-year prison term, a fine of $2,800, or both. In Turkey, the driver is taken 20 miles out into the desert and forced to walk back under police es- cort. In San Salvador drunk drivers are executed b firing squad. We had a wedding at our house last week. It was a time of joy, both for the young couple and for the opportunity for fellowship with our friends, relatives and guests. But in the midst of the festivities our 12- year-old washing machine decided to give up the ghost in a grand manner, erupting transmission grease up through the agitator smack into the middle of a load of frilly, white unmentionables. I'm still trying to decide which to replace first; the washer so I can have a clean pair of sox, or the other stuff so I won't hear any more distaff complaints about feeling a bit too "breezy". I may do neither and just disappear into my room. Which at this point would not be hard to do. In fact, when I retire at night I tie one end of a rope around my waist and the other end to the doorknob so I can find my way back out in the morning. In the weeks before the wedding, my wife's sewing table began to overflow with buttons and bows, pins, scraps of material, pieces of lace, and other such folderol: As the date grew. near, the rest of the house was scrubbed and shined for company and all the feed store calendars, insurance company scratch pads, grocery store game cards, and other truck which usually graces the dining room was moved into our room. In the final days we were too busy to read, so added to the pile was all the incoming mail, magazines, newspapers, and PTA pronouncements. Then when the washer blew up, it seemed rather point- less to cart dirty laundry from one room to another, so that too, lay where it fell. At the moment the only solution seems to be to run for congress. That way, if I'm elected I can have my room cleaned and the con- tents neatly boxed up and sent to Washington at the taxpayer's expense. My wife keeps telling me to cheer up, that things will get better. Well, she's been telling me that for 25 years and all I've gotten is older and fatter. We've ordered a new washer, but I almost hate to see it delivered. This past year we've already had to buy three new major ap- pliances and a new pickup. So far everyone of them had defects that had to be corrected after we got them home. The local dealers were ve nice about it and prompt in their service, but what is happening at the factories? What you spend several hundred dollars for a gadget, it seems like it should at least work momentarily when you plug it in for the first time or outlast its first tank of gas. I hate to complain all the time, but manage- ment or labor or someone isn't playing fair with the purchaser. No one wants more government rules and regulations, but if the makers of products don't believe in quality and pride of workmanship and try to build a reputation based on these principles, who can the consumers turn to? This was the second wedd- J \\;1i From The Files From The Perkins Journal June 6, 1957-20 years ago) The Perkins Lions Club, City Council and School Board have approved a plan to chain and lock the en- trances to the Perkins Mem- orial Park each evening at 9 p.m. The measure is being taken to curtail vandalism and young people parking in the area. During the winter, cars have been used to knock down posts that fence off the picnic area and cars have been driving through the grounds doing considerable damage to that area. The restrooms were also turned over. Work has been going on for the past week on set- ting out new grass in the area and it was pointed out by Lions President J. A. Mc- Lauchlin that the recreation area is still a public park and the lock up action has been taken in order that the park may be maintained and kept in better shape. Dick Heath, bookkeeper and assistant manager for the Vassar Manufacturing Co. is now associated with the M. P. Boydston and Company, local accounting firm according to Jack Vas- sar. Heath is a 1950 graduate of Oklahoma A & M major- ing in accounting. He is a veteran of the U. S. Navy and a Stillwater High grad. Donna McGee of Perkins has received an institutional scholarship to Oklahoma A & M College as an outstanding Oklahoma high school grad- uating senior. The grants are for $168, amount of the gen- eral college fees for the full freshman year. Otis Cowley, Perkins, was awarded a certificate at the 4-H Roundup in Stillwater last week for his 16 years leadership  4.H Work. The city council discussed purchase of a two-way radio setup for the police, fire and storm protection for the com- munity. A plan was worked out for compilation of water ing at our house in I0 months. Thanks to several local banks, credit unions and loan companies, it was a smashing success. All except the final seconds, that is. When the bride toss- ed her bouquet who do you think caught it? Daughter number three, of course. If we have another wedding next spring I'm seriously considering selling tickets instead of sending out in. vitations. Letter to the Editor York is where most of those "intellectual" interpretation of what's good for us origi- nates. I wonder why they haven't used some of their "smart" to competently manage their own affairs? I've read that the "intel- lectuals" and the liberal news media don't want a strong thinking America. Because then it would be too hard for them to have their own way. So thanks again for your island of sanity and actual individual thinking in the midst of the liberal sea of • rattle-bones rigmarole. • -s- Alice Shoup Hess "O" I yoga IF Henry Sadler Will Present This Ad At BLUMER'S CHAMPLIN before noon June 15 Will Receive 5 Gal. of Gas WATCH THIS SPACE EACH WEEK--YOU MAY BE THE NEXT WINNER! Sand Springs, Okla. June 1, 1977 Dear Mr. Evans, My esteem for The Per- kins Journal continues to grow. Thank you for your words about the Nixon-Frost interview. It is refreshing and hopeful to read an edi- tor who has given thoughtful consideration to what former President Nixon was actually saying. Too many commentators have tried to muddy our thinking with their knee-jerk following of the "Eastern" liberal media's interpreta- tions. That's why I've kept tapes of the interviews. It keeps an accurate comparison of the liberal media's bias and downright paranoic distor- tion of Mr. Nixon's mean- ings. Books such as, "It Didn't Start with Watergate"; "The God's Antenna"; "The Assassination of President Nixon"; and, "Betrayal in Vietnam", to name a few, show only too clearly that anyone (I repeat, anyone) could be ruined if the pres- sure of day after continuous day of yellow journalism was turned upon them. Isn't it a bit strange that we "local yokels" are having to bail out New York with our hard earned tax money? New consumption records starting this month. The records will be available for the board to review each month in de- termining the water situa- tion. The July 4th celebration will consist of a two day rodeo sponsored by the Roundup Club, a carnival consisting of six rides, and the big fireworks display plus the usual games and ac- tivities throughout the day. Another feature will be the election of Miss Liber- ty Bell queen to reign over festivities. Those from Perkins grad- uating from Oklahoma A & M are: Fred T. Kolosick, BS secondary education; Wil- liam C. Carlile, BS, animal husbandry; Non'is Aldredge Griffith, BS industrial en- gineering and management; James S. Kirby, BS, agron- omy; Sam W. Shelby, BS business administration, and Charles Wall, BS, animal husbandry. (From The Perkins Journal June 8, 1961-16 years ago) Three local youths are at- tending boys state. They are Nolan Lee Arthur, Donnie Cundiff and James Thomp- son. A tie vote resulted in the Perkins town council's re- fusal to approve a plat of the Timberline Drive addition to Perkins. Voting to approve the plat were councilmen Paul Weems and lins. Chairman W. and John Baker against it. Martin said the al on the thought indicated on the south plat should be 15 instead of 10 feet the developer had not met the council' cations. Judith Nelson senting the Perkins can Legion Auxiliary! State this week. (From The Perkins June 8, 1967-10, Rusty Behne Lockwood w managers of the Teen Center at a held Tuesday at thq Jaycee Community Others elected Jarvis, treasurer; Graves, secretary; Wall, Phill Hu Randy Hall, judges. Editor i We asked a local he was ready to yet. He said the about ready, but lazy! Guess who (Couldn't have Sadler?) The first load of the Perkins area wheat harvest unloaded at the Sunday afternoon Downey. Good Selection White Summer Pants in All Sizes Plus White, Navy, & Red Pants with Box Pleats on side.  r r 4r Large Blouses in Nice Fabrics - ,k "k Dressy Baby Things & Gift items W*WW Shells--Separate--but Match Most Pants Also floral cowls & stripes in blouses VIOLA 'S HOURS: 10 a.m. )o ":.;,' :, 603 E. Kirk Are..547.2862. ENJOY A DELIq • 2 night's lodging st beautiful Lincoln Plaza Inn • 2 complimentary tickets to the Dinner Theatre (food and bever- age not Included) • 1 hour free tennis privileges each day • 2 free tickets to tha Cowboy Hall " of Fame NOW • Unlimited awimming and relax- ing.tthepool € 1 |     1 Per Oersol Pus Ta m,. BaseO On Do Je C [= | l, • Oklahoma Cit/Zoo 1 i' l I--  '  NI- 1 Lodg,ng rot c,,Idre ll G.,,, .os, zopplngma o I freewhensta am "DinemG°vern°rsClublPvems . CALL 1-800/528-1234 TOLL FREE FOR RES[ ;. ASK FOR MINI VACATION PACKAGE FOLLOW THE STARS TO Lincoln Plaza Dinner This is not Judy Garland. This Is "one of the Imprasaionists in ths extraordinary Revue "French Dressing". It tl an evening of incredible illusions Judy Garland. Julie Andrews, Diana Real, Bette Mtdler, Barbta Strailand, Carol Channing. Helen Reddy, Marilyn Monroe and Shirlay Bailey, and more -- it's music, it's dancing, It's like nothing you've ever lien before ... an evening of incredible illusion. ; You've got to see it to belleve "FRENCH DRESSING" -- MAY 24 THRU JUNE For Theatre Reservations Only Call leaeeea June 24 -- Live, On Stage! StarofTVs REDD FOXX Sanford & Son And His Las Vegas Show Adult Entertainment -- A Redd Foxx ProduC. to  eee•eee LINCOLN PLAZA INN 4445 LINCOLN BLVD., OKLAHOMA CITY OK k/t 2-The Perkins Journal Thursday, June 9, 1977 PERKINS JOURNAL Robert L. md Yvomme Evans, Ovmem.Pubiidm Published each Thursday at 133 S. Main Street, Post Office Box F, Perkins, Oldahoma 74059 Second Class Postage Paid at Perki.s. Okla. 74059 Telephone...405-547.2411 Subscription Prices: Payne, Lincoln, Logan and Noble counties ............................. . ......................... $6.00 plus tax Elsewhere ......................................................... $9.00 plus tax MIMIll % A I If now is who I reod in fhe pcecI--Wifl Rogers I II II Illlll I I I I IN I -- Around the Farm by Allan Wall I llll II I Farmers have been cutting their alfalfa hay. This is the second cutting this year. Alfalfa is actually an amaz- ing farm crop. A stand of alf- alfa can last from five to seven years from the time it was planted• On a real good year, you can get five or six cuttings of it. Alfalfa also puts nitrogen in the soil. it has deep roots, and can obtain more water than many other plants. However, if alfalfa is grown in a field for too long a period of time, it robs the soil of too many minerals. This is where crop rotation comes in. The scientific name of al- falfa is Medicago Sativa. In England it is called lucerne. Alfalfa is probably native to Iran. It was introduced into Greece from Media (in north. ern Iran) about 470 B.C. it was carried from Greece to Italy, from Italy to Spain, from Spain to Mexico, from Mexico to Chile, and from Chile to California in about the mid 1800's. Al- though it had already been introduced into New York about 1820, alfalfa spread more rapidly in the west from the introduction into California. It is more adapted to the western U.S. than the East. I I I Illl Harvest is underwayt Grain farmers have been tak- ing to the fields, and com- bines are rolling. Follow this column for further reports. *** We have over 50 White Rock chickens that are now almost 2 months old. All their lives they've been con- fined in one kind of cage or another. Last Friday evening their world was greatly ex- panded. We opened the door of their house, but none of them went outside. So we threw'era out. However, they didn't go very far, ex- cept for the ones I transported a little farther out. For one thing, it was nearing their bedtime, so the far majority of the chic- kens were huddled by their house. I had to throw them back inside. The next day, however, the chickens were thrown outside and stayed for the majority of daylight. They really started to catch on to the idea of pasture. Male chickens are called cockerels till a year old, then they're called cocks. Fe- males are called pullets till a year old, then they're called hens.* See you next week, Senior Citizens News We've been having some strange weather, even for Oklahoma. After all the clouds, rain, and storms, it suddenly turned imo real summer, encouraging the use of air conditioning and helping dry the wheat fields so the combines could get into some of the fields. Then on Monday it turned cool again. Now if it could just manage to rain on the gardens that need it and not rain on the unharvested grain then everyone would be happy, but it just doesn't work that way. Several, have reported canning green beans and beets recently, also cherries and apricots and corn. Monday night, was another good music night with 142 signing the book. Recent visitors at the Cen- ter included Clinton and Wilma Easter's daughter and granddaughter, Katrina and Sharon Pratz of Mesa, Ariz., Mike Reddout, Okla. City, grandson of Floyd and Mabel Caldwell, Raul Sanchez of Oklahoma City, grandson of the Pat Knapps, Brown and Lenora Vesey of Bartlesville, daugh- ter of the John Beelers, Judy Tabor, Faiffax, daughter of Jim Rylant, also G. F. (Dec) and Winnie Robinson, ella- homa City, relatives of Pearl Freeman who came by to see the center and buy some ceramics. I don't know how the ladies find time to do so many ceramics along with the garden and yard work and canning and freezing, but they seem to manage. Guess they do ceramics while they rest. Several large pitchers and bowls and large Indian flower pots are being . made. The quilting ladies are busy again since Mrs. Re. binson's No. 1 was finished last week and No. 2 was put in the frames Monday. It's a Star Pattern and very pret.- ty. Remember the Gospel Music Sunday, June 12, 2 to 4. Several have shown an interest in having this type of program once a month so come and help by singing or playing or just listening. Birthday Dinner this month will be at noon Friday, June 17 and then the same day at 1:30 will be the tests for Diabetes by the County Health Nurse. A letter from Gertrude Dilliner says she arrived home safely and everything at her home was OK,'and "greetings" to everyone at the Center. --Clarrcy .'oak I C e , 6 Miles S. imarron o,s,,..,. Country Ballroom Dance Every Sat. Night 9-1 with Cimarron Cowboys Guests-June 14-Billy Parker Friday, July 8 - Stage Show Only Jim Ed Brown Show with Helen Cornelius Adults-S6.00 Children(under 12) $3.50 Reservatiou or Tickets Rt. 4, Box 60 405.67,4-1201 Stiliwater !,! ...... , n, i i I I III Doc Comments -- Visiting a dream of 50 years ago As you read this, I hope to be crossing the laplands of Oklahoma and Arkansas into the dreams of things of 50 years ago in northwest Alabama. The farm, the ale swimming hole, the green forest and clear running streams where the colorful fish floundered and played in the early morning sun while the birds and wildlife flour- ished with sweet music of songs and mating calls of a variety of pleasant metrical sounds of nature. Visits to loved ones and friends, dec- oration day at the rural church where we attended Sunday School and services. A family reunion for O.V.B.- 's family, the Browns, an an- nual affair of people from over the nation, good food, music and alot of fellowship. Tales of yesteryear that brings both sadness and joy. But before I go, I must fulfill a promise to report the re- sults of medicare handling an ambulance service under review which had been disal- lowed because the patient was not delivered to the dos- est approved facility. It upheld the previous ruling of disallowment which was expected. The fact is that the patient was already in the closest approved facili- ty and the attending physi- clan made a diagnosis at the case and recommended that the service of a specia- list was needed and since the closest approved facility could not furnish such serv- ice, the patient was trans- ferred by ambulance to a fa- cility with the services rec- ommended. In all fairness, we believe the handling by Medicare's servicing agent was made according to their instruction. They said, "The Medicare program pays for transportation from one hospital to another only when the first hospital does not have appropriate facili- ties to care for the patient's condition, the unavailability of a specialist is not consid- eration in determining whether the hospital has ap- propriate facilities." Now since the doctors determined that a specialist was neces- sary prior to an operation, it seems to me that is a very important part of treatment. The doctor's diagnosis was proved to be correct. Medi- care Agent said further con- sideration may be made if the charge exceeded $100. The ambulance charge was $80.00 and that takes care of the request. Now, the problem is that we should have some legis- lation providing medicare with instruction to give the patient the best in treatment according to the doctor's opinin. No one wants an in- cision without a complete diagnosis of the trouble. I am appreciative for the doc- tor's handling of the case. There was more time spent on the preparation and test than was used in the actual operation. The proof of his wisdom and experience is in the success of the opera- tion. It was successful. But we wonder what would have happened if an explorative operation had been perform- ed. I was the patient. Right or wrong, I will always be- lieve the doctor did the right thing and think there should be some consideration given to instruction by Medicare to their agents. I am not unhap- py about it but have sent complete records of the case to members of the U. S. Con- gress and Senate. With Carter's new program on Health, Education and Wel- fare, there's little chance for immediate action for change, but maybe it will get into the new program. It would seem that such instruction violates the patient's freedom of • choice in treatment. Arrivederci T. C. "Dec" Banner Barbs and Wires- A wedding at our house By Ken Anderson Someone called me the other day and asked what it took to be a writer, the first thing that came to mind was the following rules: 1. Shun, avoid, and refrain from recklessly employing unnecessary, excess, and superfluous extra words. 2. Make certain all sen. tences full & complete. If possible. 3. At all costs, in any case, avoid cliches like the plague. 4. Take pains to spell and, punctuate correct. 5. Be consistent. 6. Don't approximate. Always be more or less pre- cise. 7. Sedulously eschew ob- fuscatory hyperverbosity or prolixity. 8. Avoid pointless repetition and don't repeat yourself unnecessarily after you've already said something once and then say it again after having said it the first time. 9. Observe, in all written expression, it is, of the foremost qualification-- if not, certainly not or not less than--at least secondary then, the importance, of whenever possibly trying, so that when, except where it cannot be avoided, and/or in further necessary develop- ment it becomes impera- tive to admit, or omit, yet, remember without fail (for this must not be under: estintated) to be BRIEF and CLEAR. THIS IS VITAL! 10. Always try to remember the extrere iniportance of being accurate, neat, and • careful.. (Thanks to extension specialist Owen McGruder for the abo,,;e.) • An&her .friend, this one the editor of the Coyote "News up in Warm Springs, Oregon, advises that in older to curb drunken driv- ing in other p[rts of the world s6me pretty tough laws have been enacted .... In Malaya, the drunk is jailed. If he is married, his wife goes too. In South Africa, the driver is given a 10-year prison term, a fine of $2,800, or both. In Turkey, the driver is taken 20 miles out into the desert and forced to walk back under police es- cort. In San Salvador drunk drivers are executed b firing squad. We had a wedding at our house last week. It was a time of joy, both for the young couple and for the opportunity for fellowship with our friends, relatives and guests. But in the midst of the festivities our 12- year-old washing machine decided to give up the ghost in a grand manner, erupting transmission grease up through the agitator smack into the middle of a load of frilly, white unmentionables. I'm still trying to decide which to replace first; the washer so I can have a clean pair of sox, or the other stuff so I won't hear any more distaff complaints about feeling a bit too "breezy". I may do neither and just disappear into my room. Which at this point would not be hard to do. In fact, when I retire at night I tie one end of a rope around my waist and the other end to the doorknob so I can find my way back out in the morning. In the weeks before the wedding, my wife's sewing table began to overflow with buttons and bows, pins, scraps of material, pieces of lace, and other such folderol: As the date grew. near, the rest of the house was scrubbed and shined for company and all the feed store calendars, insurance company scratch pads, grocery store game cards, and other truck which usually graces the dining room was moved into our room. In the final days we were too busy to read, so added to the pile was all the incoming mail, magazines, newspapers, and PTA pronouncements. Then when the washer blew up, it seemed rather point- less to cart dirty laundry from one room to another, so that too, lay where it fell. At the moment the only solution seems to be to run for congress. That way, if I'm elected I can have my room cleaned and the con- tents neatly boxed up and sent to Washington at the taxpayer's expense. My wife keeps telling me to cheer up, that things will get better. Well, she's been telling me that for 25 years and all I've gotten is older and fatter. We've ordered a new washer, but I almost hate to see it delivered. This past year we've already had to buy three new major ap- pliances and a new pickup. So far everyone of them had defects that had to be corrected after we got them home. The local dealers were ve nice about it and prompt in their service, but what is happening at the factories? What you spend several hundred dollars for a gadget, it seems like it should at least work momentarily when you plug it in for the first time or outlast its first tank of gas. I hate to complain all the time, but manage- ment or labor or someone isn't playing fair with the purchaser. No one wants more government rules and regulations, but if the makers of products don't believe in quality and pride of workmanship and try to build a reputation based on these principles, who can the consumers turn to? This was the second wedd- J \\;1i From The Files From The Perkins Journal June 6, 1957-20 years ago) The Perkins Lions Club, City Council and School Board have approved a plan to chain and lock the en- trances to the Perkins Mem- orial Park each evening at 9 p.m. The measure is being taken to curtail vandalism and young people parking in the area. During the winter, cars have been used to knock down posts that fence off the picnic area and cars have been driving through the grounds doing considerable damage to that area. The restrooms were also turned over. Work has been going on for the past week on set- ting out new grass in the area and it was pointed out by Lions President J. A. Mc- Lauchlin that the recreation area is still a public park and the lock up action has been taken in order that the park may be maintained and kept in better shape. Dick Heath, bookkeeper and assistant manager for the Vassar Manufacturing Co. is now associated with the M. P. Boydston and Company, local accounting firm according to Jack Vas- sar. Heath is a 1950 graduate of Oklahoma A & M major- ing in accounting. He is a veteran of the U. S. Navy and a Stillwater High grad. Donna McGee of Perkins has received an institutional scholarship to Oklahoma A & M College as an outstanding Oklahoma high school grad- uating senior. The grants are for $168, amount of the gen- eral college fees for the full freshman year. Otis Cowley, Perkins, was awarded a certificate at the 4-H Roundup in Stillwater last week for his 16 years leadership  4.H Work. The city council discussed purchase of a two-way radio setup for the police, fire and storm protection for the com- munity. A plan was worked out for compilation of water ing at our house in I0 months. Thanks to several local banks, credit unions and loan companies, it was a smashing success. All except the final seconds, that is. When the bride toss- ed her bouquet who do you think caught it? Daughter number three, of course. If we have another wedding next spring I'm seriously considering selling tickets instead of sending out in. vitations. Letter to the Editor York is where most of those "intellectual" interpretation of what's good for us origi- nates. I wonder why they haven't used some of their "smart" to competently manage their own affairs? I've read that the "intel- lectuals" and the liberal news media don't want a strong thinking America. Because then it would be too hard for them to have their own way. So thanks again for your island of sanity and actual individual thinking in the midst of the liberal sea of • rattle-bones rigmarole. • -s- Alice Shoup Hess "O" I yoga IF Henry Sadler Will Present This Ad At BLUMER'S CHAMPLIN before noon June 15 Will Receive 5 Gal. of Gas WATCH THIS SPACE EACH WEEK--YOU MAY BE THE NEXT WINNER! Sand Springs, Okla. June 1, 1977 Dear Mr. Evans, My esteem for The Per- kins Journal continues to grow. Thank you for your words about the Nixon-Frost interview. It is refreshing and hopeful to read an edi- tor who has given thoughtful consideration to what former President Nixon was actually saying. Too many commentators have tried to muddy our thinking with their knee-jerk following of the "Eastern" liberal media's interpreta- tions. That's why I've kept tapes of the interviews. It keeps an accurate comparison of the liberal media's bias and downright paranoic distor- tion of Mr. Nixon's mean- ings. Books such as, "It Didn't Start with Watergate"; "The God's Antenna"; "The Assassination of President Nixon"; and, "Betrayal in Vietnam", to name a few, show only too clearly that anyone (I repeat, anyone) could be ruined if the pres- sure of day after continuous day of yellow journalism was turned upon them. Isn't it a bit strange that we "local yokels" are having to bail out New York with our hard earned tax money? New consumption records starting this month. The records will be available for the board to review each month in de- termining the water situa- tion. The July 4th celebration will consist of a two day rodeo sponsored by the Roundup Club, a carnival consisting of six rides, and the big fireworks display plus the usual games and ac- tivities throughout the day. Another feature will be the election of Miss Liber- ty Bell queen to reign over festivities. Those from Perkins grad- uating from Oklahoma A & M are: Fred T. Kolosick, BS secondary education; Wil- liam C. Carlile, BS, animal husbandry; Non'is Aldredge Griffith, BS industrial en- gineering and management; James S. Kirby, BS, agron- omy; Sam W. Shelby, BS business administration, and Charles Wall, BS, animal husbandry. (From The Perkins Journal June 8, 1961-16 years ago) Three local youths are at- tending boys state. They are Nolan Lee Arthur, Donnie Cundiff and James Thomp- son. A tie vote resulted in the Perkins town council's re- fusal to approve a plat of the Timberline Drive addition to Perkins. Voting to approve the plat were councilmen Paul Weems and lins. Chairman W. and John Baker against it. Martin said the al on the thought indicated on the south plat should be 15 instead of 10 feet the developer had not met the council' cations. Judith Nelson senting the Perkins can Legion Auxiliary! State this week. (From The Perkins June 8, 1967-10, Rusty Behne Lockwood w managers of the Teen Center at a held Tuesday at thq Jaycee Community Others elected Jarvis, treasurer; Graves, secretary; Wall, Phill Hu Randy Hall, judges. Editor i We asked a local he was ready to yet. He said the about ready, but lazy! Guess who (Couldn't have Sadler?) The first load of the Perkins area wheat harvest unloaded at the Sunday afternoon Downey. Good Selection White Summer Pants in All Sizes Plus White, Navy, & Red Pants with Box Pleats on side.  r r 4r Large Blouses in Nice Fabrics - ,k "k Dressy Baby Things & Gift items W*WW Shells--Separate--but Match Most Pants Also floral cowls & stripes in blouses VIOLA 'S HOURS: 10 a.m. )o ":.;,' :, 603 E. Kirk Are..547.2862. ENJOY A DELIq • 2 night's lodging st beautiful Lincoln Plaza Inn • 2 complimentary tickets to the Dinner Theatre (food and bever- age not Included) • 1 hour free tennis privileges each day • 2 free tickets to tha Cowboy Hall " of Fame NOW • Unlimited awimming and relax- ing.tthepool € 1 |     1 Per Oersol Pus Ta m,. BaseO On Do Je C [= | l, • Oklahoma Cit/Zoo 1 i' l I--  '  NI- 1 Lodg,ng rot c,,Idre ll G.,,, .os, zopplngma o I freewhensta am "DinemG°vern°rsClublPvems . CALL 1-800/528-1234 TOLL FREE FOR RES[ ;. ASK FOR MINI VACATION PACKAGE FOLLOW THE STARS TO Lincoln Plaza Dinner This is not Judy Garland. This Is "one of the Imprasaionists in ths extraordinary Revue "French Dressing". It tl an evening of incredible illusions Judy Garland. Julie Andrews, Diana Real, Bette Mtdler, Barbta Strailand, Carol Channing. Helen Reddy, Marilyn Monroe and Shirlay Bailey, and more -- it's music, it's dancing, It's like nothing you've ever lien before ... an evening of incredible illusion. ; You've got to see it to belleve "FRENCH DRESSING" -- MAY 24 THRU JUNE For Theatre Reservations Only Call leaeeea June 24 -- Live, On Stage! StarofTVs REDD FOXX Sanford & Son And His Las Vegas Show Adult Entertainment -- A Redd Foxx ProduC. to  eee•eee LINCOLN PLAZA INN 4445 LINCOLN BLVD., OKLAHOMA CITY OK k/t