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Newspaper Archive of
The Perkins Journal
Perkins, Oklahoma
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November 21, 1996     The Perkins Journal
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November 21, 1996
 

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/ extra horses in payment for the use of the horses. Several times though, the horses were taken by force and then returned several years later, so it all worked out to the good for Grand Dad to trade, whether in a good mood or ? Then, Grand Ma was a good nurse and many of the outlaws would step by for treatment of many different types of wounds. Many were gunshot wounds, but some were of a different nature, A rope burn is a very serious one and hard to heal. Cuts could be- come infected if not treated prop- erly and these were the most of- 1996 ten. Many would stop just for something to eat as they could I not show in any town or be seen by one of the lawmen. 111 Open 547-2477 8-5:30 LEGAL NOTICES (Published in The Perkins Journal, 1 time, November 21,1996 The Alfred A. and Anna Elizabeth Johnson home built in 1897. 8In 12 ~ OF IDUCA110H ~ NTImAIf OF ANDCALLFORANELECllOH DOWN MEMORY LANE son 11~ InITWATIm NllDS M ltll alNEIUd. IqJNO TO MAII~AIM A U~AL 11RM OF SCHOOL FOrt ~ ~~ YEAR: tmnzao.(Rqu~ ~ ~ ikONS) .............................. ~k~.... .............................................. $ 110.000 ba~u~lon ~ ............................................. $ abeth 114 Sec. 2 R. 1 the Perkins , go seven miles ;the old Luster and go one half comer of The section line the middle of lning of the we must and there were farm- blacksmiths !aisers Anna came from Were of the due to pres- change to the from in- left their and came to aad settled in they were ~tlld workers of of marriage of ]s not known William 26, 1876 not indicated. January 3, (my dad) 2, 1880 in from there aortheast cor- a town called born and Charles then moved of Arkansas on Novem- Terri- a brother I ill Bunting came to John. the :City when had all over. ' were and as they wagon to most of the A wood with a five A Home was badly Created a de- lay as it was necessary to r eturn to Ark City to replenish the dam- age. No hurt of any special ef- fects happened to the ones in the wagon, except a great sadness for the loss of the treasured dishes for most were from the Old Country and treasures of the family. The trip into the Promised Lands was made without any more bad happenings except the mud and cold because there were several nights that the weather did not cooperate very nicely. The family found a nice spring of water in the southeast corner of the quarter section and it was there they set up camp. Bill Bunting bought a plot of land near there, but sold his rights and went to Sapulpa and went into the banking, as the tornado of 1893 destroyed his business. The Johnsons built a two story log house and a nice log barn for the land was covered with very nice timber, such as oak, walnut , hickory and some native.fruit. Here was born four more chil- dren: Elias Gerald, August 20, 1890; Anna Elizabeth on May 12, 1892; Wade McKinley on Novem- ber 7, 1895 and Alta Alice on November 15, 1897, but she died from measles on March 23, 1899. A log school house was con- structed just east of the Johnson place on the Hays property. This school was called the Johnson School for many years and then became the Oak Grove and Dis- trict 59. The tornado of April 22, 1893, ripped off the top of the Johnson home and then went on past the log school house and moved it just enough that the door would not open and the chil- dren had to be removed through one of the windows. Grand Ma ran over to be of whatever help possible and found the windows were broken out and ran back to her home and picked up quilts and whatever possible to cover the children as it was very cold. The ground was covered with small hail. This same tornado continued on east to destroy Ci- marron City that was just across the next section or about a mile away. From there on east to de- stroy and kill. No one was killed at Cimarron City, but several were hurt quite badly. One, a broken leg, several with cuts and bruises. Being of a superstitious nature, the Johnsons moved to the northwest corner of the homestead as there was a good Camp of Washington Irving in "The Chronicles" Camp" of Washington Irving in Payae 832, is described by Carla Chlouber of Ripley, State University in the latest edition of Oklahoma." the journey by Irving through the "cross is now Oklahoma. It was part of a more eX- Irving described in his famous book, "A Chlouber is managing editor of agricultural where she earned bachelor's and master's reviews the primary documents and the land- the probable Oct.. 20, 1832 site of Irving's en- Ann Blochowiak, publications director for ociety, which publishes "The Chronicles" on Oct. 9, 1832. His party traveled along to the Cimarron Rive, traveled south to the and then returned to Fort Gibson. ; on Oct. 20 was described by Irving as a "beauti- by a fine spring and rivulet." It generally has blehan area southeast of Stillwater, but the ex- to the 7,000 members of the Okla- To become a member, call (405) 522-5242 Office, Oklahoma Historical Society, ,2100 City, OK 73105. Dues are $20 year ($15 for or $30 for families. people had picked up the pieces and recovered from the injuries, Cimarron City was moved to the section corner north or on what is now State Highway 33. A dance hall and the post office was set up on the southeast cor- ner of the School Section No. 36. A store was built on the next cor- ner of Sec. 31, but in the next township as the section line north and south is the division of townships. Part of the first Cimarron City was in both town- ships as the section line was Main Street. The Johnsons were farmers and raised livestock. They had a registered jack and Percheon stallion. Mules were the thing to have at the time. The Indians still traveled the section line and Grand Dad could talk most of the tribes' languages and for that reason, the Indians traveled sev- eral miles to make a horse trade of some type and many times just to have a horse race as most sprin$ of water there. Adm r on .................................... . ....$ Before the tornado happened, .......................................... $ ~m~. o o , o . o o , . o , o o , . o o , . . , , o , o , . o . . . . o o , . , $ the Johnson property was the ....................................... $ stage stop from Guthrie to the r..m m ......................................... $ ones in between there and Cush- c ,a .................................................. # ......................................... ing. Grand Ma had a hot meal .................................... $ ready for the passengers and the smum ....... . .............................. # .............................. #-------.----9-- teams were changed. The route ................................................ $ continued on east to the section ..o ;. : ... ~.. -. -., ,.. ~ ; : ; ; -; .. - ~ ~. ; ; ; ; ~ ~ ~ ...I.._.~.. $--~ 044 ~ 600 line and turned north and went .................................................. $ thr0ugh Cimarron City. Aiter the ...................................... , THE EST~IIO INCOME FOR THE O~JHIRAt ~ FROM ~ OTHER THAN ~STR~T AO VALO~FJd TAXE~ .... $,EsllnmlodlnonmlmmCotmly4wlllloWlocUm,ty~/-~o bcllyoK ........... $~ S. E~m~t~ ~ ~ $~e N~ .................................... $ 7. Emmu~ income from all ollw mla~lanm rm ........................ $ $, T~ol e~Imaled trireme o~m Ilmn dl~k~ ad wd~em I~ fm the ensulfli I~ ~ ...... , ........... (Sum o~ Itm 4, 6, S, & 7) B. 6a~ince requked io be r~sed kom dleuk:l id valorm'n laxse ............................. $ (Item 3 minus Nora ~ ~, ,,, m.m~me~mmmNv~mlmof01~e~actl~l $,781,366 nn~w~c~tmx~ of 3S m~l wo~d be req~ed to ~nence the We&~rm~ ~o of neon Io ct~rent expert, u ~ ~ ~h k~ the ~ ~ yew. 35 ~,m Olem 0 divtd~ W v~uaUo~ 11.L~ ~ ~ no/r~llUlr~ the ~ ol ~ ~ ~riol ~orl 20 Mill| 12. ~dlflmml numb~ o/nd~ he.loci te n~ml tho nelK~ o/thO I~hea4 clieb~ lot curry4 ~ ~ ~ ~ TH~ IITIMATED AMOUNT ~ ~ ~ REliilOl~13~ OR R~PAIRiNG SCHOOL BUILDINGS AND FO~ Pt~CHASlNG FURNiTUR~ FOR THI ENSUING ~ TON i~iOviogD ~ i~lOid TH~ SCHOOt. DISTRICT BUILDING FUND: t S,~ng. ,~od~ ~ mp~n0 ~11mMnll~ furn~m~ ~ ~lU~z~nt ............. $ 48~907 & T~ll oMinwled n4~le Io i~ flmnoN Irom Um IMdlding hind ...................... 48 907 (Smo~ ~ &~) ......................................... THS I~TIMAllO N~,OI AND SOtlRC~ FOR Ti~ t~'1~ OISTRi~T IIUIt~NO FUNO: 4. Prote~ ~ ~ hand, If ml~. ~ ~ o~immml $0~I year .................... $ 20.000 $. FJUnmN Income from oew eowoN ................................. $ -fl- (gum o~ llu~ 4 a l) I. 6~mce ,equtrN to be raleed Imm di~ M valorem ume .............................. {IWm ~ ndn~ I~m ~ ...............................................~,,,,, ,,, ~k~ t~ ~wd S .t~) SMm An elm~lo~ ~. he~d~ ulk~l Im the pVrpwe ol volinil on Ihe quee~on of ruling ~e ~ow~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ Oimtm No. l-uu~ w~l ___._J Flll~ pedml ~m,l~e ~ Io Oem~r , . Imm S.-OO tin. 1o $:OO la.m. -|MI~ of the tribes owned a good race horse. Some of these were sto- len from Texas and as the horses u,m, wy. an / f,// were unbranded, it was impos- . sible for the owner to come and / reclaim. Too, in the lands just south of the Cimarron River, u mm ** W there was very little law and for that reason, the outlaws would cross the river and then thumb PACK NO. 1 FORM 0 - - Bawd o/S their noses at what law there was on the north. One tribe of Indians had driven PUBLICATION OF ANNUAL PA, CllON OF SCHOOL DISTIUCT ELECTORS their wagons up to the Johnson home and were standing and talking, but one of the wagon had run out of grease on the A.A...al electtm of the heol Oio et El tor of the ....................................................................... wheels an this created a groan- like noise as the wheel turned on ............................... .................................................... School District No. 1-003 .. ,. .............. o,**o ..... ,... the axle. Grand Dad had jacked (nm ~ n lace up one of the wheels and re- uf ...... ~ay:~ ................................... Couty, Oklshems, will be held at .~;h~..R~ ;],t~ ..l~P.;~$..g..p. .............. moved it from the axle and one (pl,c. o pi.c., or ,ne Uo.) of the Indians had a long knife in said Di.~trict on the ...~),C,b .................... day of ...... F.~.bI.~tr;y. ..................................................... 19..9..7. on his side and by grabbing this and poking it into the pail of hezi,ninR at 7:00 a.m.. and closing at 7:00 p.m. The purpose of the election ie to vote o,i the follc~'ing indicsted black axle grease and then propo.~itions: spreading the grease on the axle and then Grand Dad wiped off !. Memh~. of l~)ard of Educution. Office No ..... 2..~3..gt:~.,) the knife on the grass and poked 2. Member of I )ard of Education. Office No ..................... it back into the scabbard. This created quite a commotion and (Notification and declaration as a clndidate for membership on the Baird of Education must be made with the the Indians were poking their County Election Board between tim houri of'. hands at the Indian with the V , e.qher , 2 , . . 1996 knife and making fun of him 8:0o ..m. on lo.da.v ...................... ....................................... ......................... , ..... until Grand Dad did the same thing to one of the others when and 5:00 p.m. on Wedne.~day ...... ]~C,e~]~gr. .............................................. .~ ............................ 19..9.~) the next wheel was ready to be (day) greased. The Indians trusted Grand Dad 3. I 0 ................... Mill I x'ml S.pl rt Levy. and made many trades of many ................. different things. Sometimes for a cow or calf to be butchered and 4. . .................. $ ......................... Mill Levy. eaten. Many times, the mar- ,.omb, r) ran River would be too high for the Indians to ford and they 5 .................. .~. ....... . ................. Mill guildin| Levy. would camp on either side until " the water would go down. While in camp, the Indians needed food i;.............................................. Dispensinl with School. and would trade for most any- thing they could use for food. If a cow or calf could not be had, this ..... .7!.h. ........ , ........... o ................ ...................... .......................... 19. h then a horse. ~.~ o~~o~r~:.(~...~__~ ~ Grand Dad had several nice riding horses and one morning, it was discovered several of the ................ t ' .....' ................................. ( or I h .tto ) best horses were missing. By tracking the animals, it was de- sed for Annual E ecti0ns only. termined the thief had crossed the river and it would have been (SEAL) useless to have attempted to fol- low. A few mornings later, sev- eral good horses were found in the pasture and the ones stolen had been returned and on one of the halters wU pinned a note of