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Newspaper Archive of
The Perkins Journal
Perkins, Oklahoma
Lyft
November 28, 1985     The Perkins Journal
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November 28, 1985
 

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/ The l'erk|ns Journal znursaay, ovemoer --- r j~ur, o tics obtained by The from the Oklahoma logical Survey, Nor- :lahoma, indicates that so far during the 10 could set a new would equal the old 59.36 inches in 1959. in this area will the rainfall of 1959, Corner north of under water for months until the department opened west, on the north to Twin Lakes. time 9.72 inches of in July, followed by during the last and 13.15 in- first part of October of nearly 26 inches in period. greatest rainfall since records were L948, was 1957 when of rain fell. This history when the crest ever record- water from the south of the river to north of the river The railroad track out and Perkins lost as a result. 47.36 inches snow have fallen. This total rainfall is the PERK IN $ ( ],~; )0;3! TOTAL ~hTI-LY PRECIPIT AT [GN {INCHES| ly to the 1959 total of 59.36 inches. In contrast, in 1984, the total ,e,, j,N tee ,P |L ,,, Ju, e co, ,L rainfall in Perkins was 35.85 in- ches. In 1983, the total was 19,e c.T9 |.T~, ,.02, 6.2 * 3.8o 36.81. |949 7.78 I °08 | .81 [.58 13 .16 5.92 2.o1 tqS0 I*E4 0.9~ 0.53 t*77 5.64 2.27 10.90 Many of the farmers will 19~1 z.69 z.z6 o.es |.23 e.,7 6.|4 ,.23 remember the drouth of the late 9e2 c.4a |.42 2.,o |.Ts .o9. 195.TM 0.73 i.|E ~.70* "%70 1.1~8 3.15 10.33 40's and early 50's, which along |994 | .s, o .as o -_. |4 o.;e |.84 with the Eisenhower farm c.e I.|, |.sz o. s a. 9 3.a z.7 1956 0.44 0*F9 0,'' 0.~1 4*09 2.l| 1.28 policy and dry weather, cleaned|997 1.0| i.|9 z.07 z.2, s.93 |.os out most of those families living |9_ s o. ee ,.96 | .99 r. 4 ,.11 1959 0.43 1.32 3.15 3.'2 .~.7S ~*'? (;.72 on 40 and 80 acres in this area. 190c ¢. 1.9; o.7o | .,o z This was the period that Per- 0.00 2.9 0.,? 3. 2 s.4 .oo kins lost several of their | 67 o.s 2.,0 s.,, -..29 |9~.TM ¢.43 0*|1 2.50 2.16 5.20 2.46 5.42 business establishments, in- 19 , o.ss a.|.. |.ee s.2e |.74 cluding three grocery stores, a19 s | | .es 2.3, 4.,, hardware store, and a general .co 2. s 3.7s |967 l*SS 0.30 |.18 "~.,8 (~ • (~S 6. S9 1.29 merchandise store. |~ee 1.~;3 0.T0 3.20 2,52 4.S8 2.09 3.82 gh 1969 0.13 2.54 2.-~8 2.09 2.17 4.48 leSl The rainfall throu the dry 19 0 0.33 0.14 z.3 7.s4 .09 years began with an 18.11 total 19,1 2.o| 0.0o 2. 7 2.43 3.ss r. r in 1948, and did not catch up 0.30 o.7 .77 i.e 2. s.- 3. 4 again until 1957 when the rain- 1973 ,,. 999.oo. 2,39 3.03 2.9o .ss • 1974 0.05 1,96 2,52 3,44 0.83 5009 G,82 fall totals stabilized once again.19 7s 2 .as 1.9, s .Is | .,z 11 ,es s. |, 3. |2 Following are the annual rain- 19 e 9¢9.oo, 1.7+4 I. O z.3 o.,s 1977 0,3~- 0,57~ 999 *0O0 1,4' 8.18 O*GS -~*12 fall totals during what went 1970 9ss. oo,3.1,, o.?s l,S| s..6 4,34 |.~3 down in history as the drouth 1979 .37, o.3e.., :, 2.70, 7.c0 4.73 years: t~"O 2.1& 0.9S 999.00, 4.21 ?.,el 7.27 0.07 |9Sl 0cOS ¢.40 2.00 1.34 6.74 4.56 3.95 1948 ................ 18.11" 19sz z.73 ~.a, i.,0 2.~I |e.e~ ,,.e~ 2.16 1949 ................ 43.65" 0. ee 3.e9 3 .,4 z .26 .s? 4 .Sl o .oo 1950 ................ 32.54" 1,951 ................ 44.10" 1952 ................ 18.39" 1953 ................ 35.57" 1954 ................ 19.55" 1955 ................ 28.31" 1956 ................ 19.19" 1957 ................ 50.34" 2o61 0.7S 0.3b -) .34~ 0.~2 2001 i~.l! 1.09 4.39 304~ ~40 UG* |,~ 3,97 43.65 2,90 3,00 l*lO l.lC 0o21 2.71 .~2.~4 2.(;3 8.bS 4.71 3.41 O.O0 3.67 44,10 1,~~. 1.12 (:*0~ Z,~3 1.02 1.O7 18.39 3.66 2.74 6.30 U,9(. 0,~:e 3*2.= 2~.*~7 2,C4 C*SO |,Z:~ ~,.5~ 1.~-~ 1.63 19.$5 0.77 3.35 4.31 O,GC C*l(= 2.36 26.31 0.84 0.23 3.1~ ~.13 ~' ,,,O 7 1.60 lg. |(; 3.21 ~,73 1,75; 3,18 1,18 4,19 50.3~t 5.9S I **~ 1.2tt 1.12 i.03 ~0£(~ 2,..~0 0,~3 12.21 |3.1:~ 0.bb ~!.~2 4.9S .s(;. 30 3e23 0*78 6.9.~ 0*?l 2*41 2.e? 34*44 3.80 10,75 2.2~! :~.2b 106~ 3.44 41.27 1.10 ~.1, 2.52 |.be 1.26 2097 3S.69 2.12 1.31 1.,2~ Z.C4 G*46 ;..|2 2.~.4; 6.87 2.73 0.~5 b*~b 0*83 2.7=. .~200.TM 1.~;~. 1~.~4 0.88 0005 2.43 2.77 33.20 3.b3 1.o2 0.41 0.3b 1.22 :*lC 2~.2¢ 2.17 5042 2.89 0aS| 1.~17 2.91 33°?3 1.42 1.90 3.24 4.~e 2.¢E 2071 32.s0 2.71 3.98 4.40 @.04 1.36 2.37 ;S. 4(: 0.02 ?.SS 4.3l 0.53 0.32 2.$8 32.14 2.1S 9.93 2,(:2 O.GO 3*24 2.12 27.2q 6.46 2030 5.72 2.3b 0.O6* 2.89 .tl,7~. 2.OF 7.12 2.E1 3.22 i.~q 2.~12 32.17 4.43 999 ,O0* 6.dO ~4.14 |*425 4*C2 4¢* IE 1.00 i,Sg 999.004 999*004 9~9,004 3*~1 34.33 2.3S |,96 2*01 0.40 ¢*QG ~051 17.22 3*53 99g*00* 1,1@ l,b~ 0.3~ 2.37 18.98 0.73 0.80 1.~5 4.0~; (:,6S 2*,2 2~.21 l.S5 O.S? 1.31 2.44 2.Z2 2.~2 16.;." 1,27 2*e0 |,lg 0.79 10o4 2,t'4 30Jib 4,54 2,47 "~*.~3 3.54 0.2*t 2*{~E 24. 2S OeE7 1*|7 1.18 2.71 3.S2 3,41 4C,~2 I.OE 2*20 IC.GI 1.05 C. 41e ' 3.35 36.01 LTME AN 1.35 !.29 2.18 2.50 5.60 4.2| 3.Sl 2."-= 2.eg 3.20 2.12 1.30 2.~t3 33.9J Although the annual rainfall ............. thank yOU note from Mrs. Cliff for thatperiod is eractic, it doesn'tlook allthat bad. Coyle News WilliamS,letters fromalS°thesheGeneralread Federa-Several H°wever' furtherevaluati°n I tion Womens Club. shows that the rain wasn't pre- By Velma owney Mrs. Elmer Downey presen- sent when it was needed in the spring and fall months to make ted the program on "Stolen in Perkins in 1948. rainfall, which the total up to 50 the wheat harvest and create r more, plus what falls the winter pasture. When rain- could set a new fall goes under 20 inches a year take second four years out of nine, which it second on- has never done since, agricul- ture problems will exist. CLEANERS A heavy dew is actually the )rive-Up Window portent of good weather. Beautifully On cloudless nights the Fan Folded earth loses its heat more 4th & Main rapidly, and a heavier dew Oklahoma results. Stillwater School of Cosmetology Nationally Accredited Grants and Guaranteed Student Loans Available A Careerin less than a year. • Latest styles & cutting techniques Basic, advanced, and instructor courses ;all now for our next starting class. HAIRCUT SPECIAL 00 PERM ,SPECIALS s15oo III oo $ AND All Work Done By Supervised Students 132 S. Main M-F g:30-5. Sat. 9-5 372-4800 Week's winner: Bonnie Huffington 0 s Will Be Held on Fridays High Tech Secrets." In her pro- Mr. and Mrs. Wilmer Pep- gram she brought out the fact miller, Mr. and Mrs. Michael that at the present time in the United States there are three cases of espionage before the courts. Since these cases have been exposed the maximum sentence is 10 years. There have been over 250 spies expelled from foreign countries. The real Perrin, of Coyle and Mrs. Jon- nie Jafek of Stillwater attended Stillwater Rebekah Lodge No. 37 recently. This was their Thanksgiving supper. At the O.S.U. Homecoming parade in Stillwater Miss world of espionage is stranger than fiction. Refreshments were served by the hostess to the members pre- sent. During the-social hour names were drawn for the an- nual Christmas party and gift exchange which will be Dec, m- Michele Perrin, Miss Teen Oklahoma rode in the parade, she is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Michael Perrin. On November 10th Mr. and Mrs. Harold Wood of San Gabriel, California visited with their cousin Mrs. Velma Dow- ney,also Mrs. Tommy Downey ber 10th at three thirty in the and son, Charles Cecil and Cecil afternoon at the home of Mrs. Earnest Bentley, east of town. Roll call for the Christmas meeting will be "The Real Meaning of Christmas" Mrs. Flasch gave each member pre- sent the title of a Christmas song and the history of it. The Progress Sunshine Quilt- ing Club met Wednesday in Progress Community building for a luncheon and all day meeting, hostesses were Mrs. Donna Bridenstine, Mrs. Dora Bentley and Mrs. Gladys House the invocation preceding the luncheon was given by Mrs. Carolyn Bridenstine. Mrs. Lavone Cundiff, presid- ed at the meeting in the absence of the president Ruth Ann Bridenstine, which opened with the Lord's Prayer and flag salute. Fourteen members were present and three guest's, Mrs. Cora Moore of E1 Monte, Cali- fornia, Jennifer Bentley and Hilery Bridenstine. The door prizes were won by Mrs. Cora Moore and Mrs. Phone 547-5183 Thomas Mattingly. They were enroute to their home after a month's vacation. On their trip they visited Winnipeg, Lake of the Woods, went to Vermont for the fall foliage, to Duluth, then to Sault St. Marie, Michigan on the Quebec, Canada. After spending a month in New York, Vermont and Pennsylvania they visited Longwood Gardens at Kennett Square, on the Hershey, Pa. and the Amish country near Lancaster, Pa. In Pittsburg, Pa. they visited their daughter-in- law's parents the Limbacks, then they journeyed through, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Mis- souri, Kansas, and Oklahoma, they visited lots of scenic points and musuems, Niagra Falls, Canada, Machinac Lake, Mich. saw the gateway arch in St. Louis, Missouri. After leaving Coyle in their motor home they went to Oklahoma City and spent the night with another cousin Wynona Cherry Canada. Mrs. Wood, is the daughter of Lela Cherry Kelly, Wynona Cherry Canada the daughter of John Cherry and Velma Downey, is the daughter of Mary Emma Cherry Priess, the Cherrys were brother and sisters and as they grew up in the Pleasant Valley, communi- ty northwest of Coyle. All the Cherry's are deceased they came to Oklahoma from Ohio where they were born. Mrs. Wood was the former Miss Louise Kelley of Guthrie and is a graduate from Guthrie High School with the class of 1941. Happy Thanksgiving to all my readers at this time of the year when we do have so much to be thankful for, the first thanks should come to all of ua .m is that Jesus died on the cross mm • for us, then we should give thanks to all the Love He gives us. We could go on and on with • our thankfulness to him but m remember to give thanks for his precious word the Bible. The Y.I.M. Study Club met for their November meeeting in I the home of Mrs. Martha Dob- son at seven o'clock in the evening. Mrs. Otto Flasch presided I with the meeting opening with the club womens collect led by irklns the hostess. Poll call was answered on cur rent events. Mrs. Flasch read a Mr. and Mrs. Carl Patterson To Observe ,4nniversary Sunday Mr. and Mrs. Carl Pattersom of Cushing will observe their Golden Wedding Anniversary with a reception on Sunday, December 1, 1985 from 2 until 4 p.m. at the Cushing Youth and Community Center, 800 S. Little. Their children--Jim and Carlene Frisbie and Kenneth and Jimalea Patterson and grandchildren--Larry and Holly Myrick, Jay Frisbie, Bill and Liz Patterson and Aryn Patterson will host the reception. They have one great randchild, Cassidy Jae Myrick. Carl Patterson and Goldie Kelly were married on November 28, 1935. She is the daughter of Dora Kelly and late Ed Kelly who was Payne County Commissioner from 1960 to 1968. Mr. Patterson is a retired farmer and oilfield worker. All friends and relatives are invited to the informal open house celebration and the couple requests no gifts. Carolyn Bridenstine. Mrs. Jes- sie Hamilton received a Birth- day gift from her secret pal. Election of officers was held with Mrs. Kathryn Bast|an be- ing named president, vice- president Ima Jean Cundiff, alterbate, Mrs. Doris Bentley. The remainder of the afternoon was spent in quilting on a baby quilt and quilt blocks. The ser- ving tables were decorated with pumpkin candles, minuature -O- VISIT OUR NEW TOY DEPARTMENT Toys and Games For All Ages From Bicycles to Baby Dolls pligrims and turkeys. The next meeting will be the Christmas meeting. (McDaniel and Son Hardware) !; .! ~" %! ~¢tZ. ~k ",:e C~ • ¢ L £ ~r "S "? I: